Eleanor Longden: The Voices in My Head (TED Talk)

10 Aug


From an interview with Jon Ronson in The Guardian:

“Owing to a series of childhood traumas, I was a very anxious and unhappy teenager, and the voice’s methodical observations started to feel like a reminder that in the midst of crushing unhappiness and self-doubt, I was still carrying on with my life and responsibilities. I even wondered whether other people had similar commentaries but just never talked about it.”

“I…started making links between my emotions and the voice, and by putting this theory to the test, had achieved some positive results. In this instance, I’d stood up to another student in a particular seminar group who used to put me down a lot – usually, if I tolerated it, the voice would sound irritated, but when I was assertive and defended myself, it returned to its normal, calm tone.”

“[W]hat what research suggests is that voice-hearing (and other unusual experiences, including so-called delusional beliefs) are surprisingly common in the general population. This recognition has led to the popularity of ‘continuum models’ of mental health, which suggests different traits and experiences are all part of human variation – not strictly categorical in terms of ‘us and them,’ ‘sane and insane,’ ‘normal and abnormal.’ However, I do think life events play a vital role in determining who becomes distressed and overwhelmed and who doesn’t. This might include experiences of abuse, trauma, inequality, powerlessness and so on, but it can also include the immediate reactions of the people around you. If you don’t have people who will accommodate your experiences, support you, and help you make sense of what’s happening, then you’re probably much more likely to struggle.”

“For me personally, an analogy for all this is ‘a psychic civil war’. You start taking a blaming, negative stance towards your own mind. And the more I began to become fearful and resistant towards the voices (shouting at them, trying to drown them out, being abusive towards them) the more persistent, intrusive, and aggressive they became. I explore this concept in a lot more detail in the TED Book, but it has been neatly summarized by Marius Romme, co-founder of the Hearing Voices Movement: voices are messengers that carry important messages about genuine problems in the person’s life. Therefore it simply does not make sense to ‘shoot the messenger’ and deny the content of the message. My voices embodied all my (considerable) emotional problems.”

“Our society is given extraordinarily pessimistic messages about ‘schizophrenia’ (even though, as I discuss in my TED Book, the concept of schizophrenia as a valid entity is very problematic and contested) and in turn it can fill people with an overwhelming amount of hopelessness about themselves. Of course, everyone’s recovery story is unique and different, just as our experiences are. But I think a crucial part is providing hope, information, and choice. And being given opportunities to make sense of what’s happening to you, and what can be done about it: if passive drugging, sedation, and silencing is the cure response, then an active understanding, exploration, and integration of the emotional and social meaning of the person’s experience is the recovery response. But my own feeling is that things would never have got as bad as they did if I’d had someone available from the beginning to help de-escalate this crisis in a more positive way.”

“In my own case, I believe the reason I began hearing voices had to do with traumatic life events, and this was a separate issue that certainly needed to be dealt with. But what actually happened was that I ended up on the Schizophrenia Scrapheap – diagnosed, drugged, discarded, and with all the problems that had driven me mad in the first place still unprocessed and unresolved. Plus a whole burden of new difficulties, in terms of stigma, discrimination, medication side-effects, and a crippling sense of hopelessness, humiliation and despair about myself.”

“It was a complex process and happened gradually – and some voices took longer to change than others. But primarily it was when I stopped attacking and arguing with them, and began to try and understand them, and relate to them more peacefully. It was about putting an end to the internal civil war I mentioned earlier, because each of them was part of a whole – me! I would thank them for drawing my attention to conflicts I needed to deal with. I remember one very powerful moment, several years down the line, when I said something like, ‘You represent awful things that have happened to me, and have carried all the memories and emotion because I couldn’t bear to acknowledge them myself. All I’ve done in return is criticize and attack you. It must have been really hard to be so vilified and misunderstood.’ There was an immensely long pause before one of them finally responded: ‘Yes. Thank you.'”

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/aug/08/ted-talk-eleanor-longden-schizophrenia

Advertisements

One Response to “Eleanor Longden: The Voices in My Head (TED Talk)”

  1. painspeaks August 15, 2013 at 6:56 pm #

    Reblogged this on The Daily Advocate By Painspeaks.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

healing from the freeze

trauma, dissociation and embodiment

Jennifer Hofmann

Inspiration for soul-divers, seekers, and adventurers.

'Merica Magazine

For the Unlikely Patriot.....

recovery network: Toronto

people can and do recover from what is sometimes called "mental illness"

suzannerbanks

scent . intention . consciousness . essential oils

we hunted the mammoth

the new misogyny, tracked and mocked

Laura K. Kerr, PhD

Writer • Scholar • Speaker

The Belle Jar

"Let me live, love and say it well in good sentences." - Sylvia Plath

DIVISION DESIGN INITIATIVE

Collaborating to Refine our Design Vision for a Growing Division

Birth of a New Brain

A Writer Healing from Postpartum Bipolar Disorder (Bipolar, Peripartum Onset)

Queer Guess Code

Unraveling Sex and Gender in Pop Culture

Oregon Fall Foliage

Let us help you find the best color throughout Oregon

The Daily Advocate By Painspeaks

Advocacy is FREE and its never-ending ripples spread awareness for all worthy causes!

Musings of a Bipolar Mama

Your not-so-average ramblings of a bipolar mama

Writing for Recovery

Write, speak, heal, live. Say the unsayable.

Kate McKinnon

explorer | ingenieur

Shapely Prose

2007-2010

The Rhubosphere

Ro Smith's writing blog and review site

WOMEN. HEALING. VIOLENCE.

A curation project

%d bloggers like this: